About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
KPIX (CBS) 43
KBCW (CW) 3
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
scraping the ice off their windshields. julie watts says there's another change on the way. julie. >> that's right. i'm in for paul tonight filling in or weather duty and i can tell you temperatures already beginning to drop. in fact, current temperatures out there right now anywhere from the low 50s to mid-40s and they will get cooler from there. the good news is not quite as chilly as last night. we'll see freezing temperatures but a bit more mild. rain returns thursday afternoon, a wet windy extended forecast is coming up. >> thank you. >>> what's rich in the eyes of congress? how the "fiscal cliff" rescue plan may hinge on differing definitions. >> this hotel has done nothing for us but try to bring us down. >> a nuisance neighbor closed by the courts. why the owner of a bay area hotel known as a haven for hookers says he should be allowed to reopen. >> and some advice for drivers and pedestrians who take to the streets of san francisco. ,,,,,, at least one republican >>> a looming vote on a republican plan to avert the "fiscal cliff" is exposing some party fractures tonight. at least
sounds too good to be true and in some cases it is. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts with how many cars have overstated mileage estimates. >>> reporter: meet the 5 passenger hybrid. >> reporter: ford's answer to the prius. >> c max and fusion hybrids. both boast 47 miles per gallon but when consumer reports recently tested vehicles it found the c-max actually delivered 37 miles per gallon the fusion 39. >> the cars are not getting the fuel economy you would expect. >> reporter: last month both kia and hyundai admitted they overstated mileage on more than one-third of the vehicles they have sold since last year. john bought his kia based on those estimates. but instead of getting the advertised 21 city and 28 highway he says he is getting an average 16 miles per gallon. >> we decided to try to use it only for freeway driving. >> we have seen a lot of liberties taken in the advertising. >> reporter: a consumer watchdog believes carmakers boost mileage estimates to sell cars. his group is asking car owners to track their own mileage and report if it's not living up to the estimat
identities at dozens of area gas stations. julie watt shows us what the stations are doing. >> reporter: they are supposed to offer a bit of protection, security stickers slapped on gasp lien pump. in the sticker is broken, someone may have tried to open the machine. >> when i looked at my account, i saw a withdrawal for 300- dollar which i knew i had not made. >> reporter: this time last year, it happened to 300 customers at lucky supermarkets when crooks installed a few skimmers that went unnoticed for days. we saw some sticker, some cut, some peeled off. sign of tampering? >> not necessarily. >> we have not had any kind of skimmer devices put on any one of our equipment. >> reporter: he wants to put it that way. rotten robbie is joining others moving from low tech stickers to newer generation readers. >> once you try to get inside, it won't work. it's broken. >> reporter: joan at gas station card receiptors are one example of new technology spoke for a downturn in skimmer scan. >> the counter measures have really improved. >> like this pump that sounds an aalmost and kills the power
change is on the horizon. julie watts is in for meteorologist paul deanno with more on the chilly temperatures coming our way. >> the good news is if i are tired of chilly temperatures we're going to see more mild temperatures. but they come are ran and wind. one or the other. they come with rain and wind. outside temperatures dropping rapidly this evening. right now current temperatures anywhere from low 40s to low 50s. certainly a bit more mild by the bay in oakland and san francisco where we're around 50. temperatures dropping overnight not as chilly as yesterday. temperatures for most folks likely in the mid- to upper 30s although a few spots will likely hit freezing. the rain returns tomorrow afternoon and we stay wet and windy through the extended forecast. i'll have details coming up in a bit. >> thank you. >> done nothing for us but try to bring us down. >> shut down because of prostitution. why a notorious bay area motel looks like it will reopen. >> just one day out of the blue they were all gone. >> a rash of bizarre bay area thefts. what used to be here on the sidewal
and as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts shows us, the chain now finds itself right back where it started. >> i got two coupons so i came in to use them. >> reporter: they're back, coupons at j.c. penney. the store famously got rid of coupons and sales earlier this year and replaced them with everyday low prices but while the signs say no coupons, they have sales. they reportedly emailed friends and family coupons offering a three-day discount last week. >> i think their core customer base is hungry for deals. >> reporter: a professor of retail strategy at santa clara university says that was clear by the customer turningout on black friday. the store tidessed its one and only sale of the year and long- time customers who had been staying away showed up asking for more. >> people have to have something to look forward to. >> reporter: everyday low prices aren't going to get you in the door? >> no, i come less than before. >> reporter: the professor says that's because the no sale strategy only works for a couple of specific types of stores. >> if you are involved in anything o
people and destroyed a san bruno neighborhood. cbs 5's consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains. >> reporter: in the wake of the deadly san bruno pipeline explosion, pg&e is upgrading its infrastructure, upgrades that will earn pg&e a profit and force pg&e customers to pay. >> the victims shouldn't have to suffer because pg&e's making a profit from this explosion. >> reporter: many were outraged when the california public utilities commission approved a $299 million rate increase to help pg&e pay for its pipeline safety plan. san bruno's mayor echoed a popular sentiment. >> you allow a utility responsible for the deaths of eight citizens, friends and family to profit as a direct result of that tragedy. >> the consumer watchdog group turn urged the puc not to let pg&e make any profit off its pipeline safety plan noting that many of the required fixes are due to pg&e's negligence. but pg&e's spokesman says the company is paying for its mistakes. this money is for new improvements. >> this funding was needed to meet new regulations. so these are regulations that were put in place a
is coming from? cbs 5 reporter julie watts on how much your bill is going to go up. >> reporter: in the wake of the deadly san bruno pipeline explosion, pg&e is upgrading its infrastructure. up grades that will force pg&e customers to pay. >> the victims shouldn't have to suffer because pg&e is making a profit from this explosion. >> reporter: many were outraged when the public utilities commission approved the rate increase to help pg&e to pay for its pipeline safety plan. san bruno's mayor echoed a popular sentiment. >> you allow a utility responsible for the deaths of eight citizens, friends and family, to profit as a direct result of that tragedy. >> reporter: the consumer watch dog group urgeds the puc not to let pg&e make any profit, noting that many of it is due to pg&e's negligence. but the spokesperson says the money is paying for its mistakes. >> what's important to know is that the funding was needed to meet new regulations, so these were regulations that were put in place after san bruno. any work that needs to be done to meet existing regulations has been and will continue to be
for. >> -- list who is impossible to shop for. >> cbs 5's reporter julie watts that won't break the bank and won't reveal that you waited until the last minute. >> i always wait. >> as last minute shoppers rush to check off their list it seems everyone has someone who is nearly impossible to shop for. >> my dad. >> my younger daughter. >> because you never know what the hell they want. >> we have come up with a few last minute gift ideas. first up, the aquaponics garden. >> it would be perfect for anybody, whether it was my dad who loves to cook to my little 7-year-old nephew who is obsessed with science. >> a segment on the creator. because the hot item is back ordered, forget about rush deliverly. print the ecard and your gift is ready to go. >> it can charge your phone, light or other gadgets. >> the bio light camp stove gained popularity after hurricane sandy enabling people to charge their phones. great for anyone who lives in earthquake country. it is also back ordered and comes with a digital gift tag for last minute holiday orders. >> finally, a juicer but better. no sug
to be done. >>> we're going to change gears right now. julie watts is covering the weather fours. she has the forecast. julie. >> well, certainly drizzle out there today, and showers already in the north bay. he let's get right to hi-def doppler. not a whole lot of activity just yet but when you take a closer look at the north bay you can see? scattered showers. this is just the beginning of what's moving in overnight and stick around through the morning commute. you can see the leading edge of the cold front that will make its way in, bringing with it those showers but a much bigger weather story along with that cold front as well. notice how the jet stream dips to our south as it does. it is going to usher in cold, arctic air, and that is really going to switch things up for us over the next few days. you think it's been cold lately, just you wait. we are talk snow levels down to around 2,000 feet by tuesday, although we will not see as much moisture, snow is less likely than frost. tuesday and wednesday morning we're talking freezing temperatures overnight. again, this is just the begi
or their money. cbs 5's consumer watch reporter julie watts on the does he recall ship that unexpectedly closed up shop under the cover of darkness. >> the business is gone along with the cars. >> a to truck came in and took the cars. >> also missing, their money. >> sunnyva le motor coarse has disappeared leave -- cars has disappeared. >> it is theft. >> todd parsons is out $28,000. he says they took his bmw engraver him a bad check. >> it is all a scam. >> this student wanted to eliminate a $600 car payment so she left them her vw to smell they said they were going to pay off my loan once the car was sold. >> she says they did sell her car. they just never paid off her loan. >> i don't have a car and i have to still make payments on my loan. >> it is just as bad for the man who bought her car. abe sharp says he is stuck with a vehicle he can't register because there is a lien on it. >> we don't have valid registration. >> there are dozens of similar complaints online. adding to the frustration, these folks say so far neither insurance companies nor police have been any help. >> i don't think
healthier bank account. cbs 5's julie watts on the new kind of diet intended to break bad spending habits. >> so, this was my own spread sheet. >> she may be more organized than most, but she is just like everyone else when it comes to spending. >> $4 on coffee. my mobile phone bill, cable, internet, i went out for lunch, some groceries, got my hair cut and i bought hair care product. >> items the financial adviser admits may not all be necessary. >> money is very tight right now. >> so, this week she and her family are conducting an experiment in frugality. they are not spending any money at all for seven days, a financial cleanse that she hopes will pay off. >> i get to have my leftover purchased salad from yesterday. >> her brother-in-law who recently moved in after losing his job is also taking part. >> i think it is a good opportunity. >> i'll either have coffee here or at the office. >> to prepare, the family stock the kitchen and paid their bills in advance. they also purchased their hannakah gifts early and limited themselves to one gift a piece. amanda hopes it will change her fa
reporter julie watts on the financial cleanse. >> so this is my own spreadsheet. >> reporter: she may be more organized than most, but catherine is just like everyone else when it comes to spending. >> $4 on coffee. my mobile phone bill, cable, internet. i went out to lunch. got my hair cut. and i brought a hair care products. >> reporter: items a financial adviser admits may not be necessary. >> money is very tight right now. >> reporter: so they are conducting an experiment in frugality. they're not spending any money at all for seven days, a financial cleanse that she hopes will pay off. >> i get to have my leftover salad from yesterday. >> it's a good opportunity, because we do sometimes spend excessively. >> reporter: and her teenage daughter is on board too. >> i think i might learn about more impulse control. that will be good, for all of us. >> reporter: but not even is thrilled about going without the coffee and snacks they like to buy on the run. >> i'll just have coffee here or at the office. >> reporter: to prepare, the family stocked the kitchen and paid their bills in ad
people empty handed. cbs 5 reporter julie watts ex etailer >>> gift cards are easy to give and great to get with one exception. >> why one major retailer is getting a lot of complaints. >> reporter: they were christmas gifts from his mom, but when ed tried to spend his macies gift cards. >> she said there's a zero balance. and i said there can't be. i haven't used it yet. >> reporter: his second card was no good either. his mother purchased them at a northern california safeway. they've been tucked away in a drawer for more than a year. >> the gift card representative who said these cards were already used. where? she said one of the places was online. and i said i don't shop online. guy into a store. >> reporter: he's not the only one complaining. we found similar complaints who say they too just learned their $100 gift cards were worthless. it's not just macies. two years ago a batch of best buy gift cards turned out to have zero plans as well. >> it's kind of embarrassing when it doesn't work. >> reporter: back then the problem was tampering, scammers scratch off the pin code and
, they are easy to give and great to get. with one little exception. >> julie watts explains why one major retailer is getting a lot of complaints. >> reporter: they were a christmas gift from his mom. but when ed souza tried to spend his macy's gift card yesterday... >> she said there's a zero balance on this card. i said, there can't be. i haven't used it yet. >> reporter: his second card was no good either. his mother purchased them at a safeway and ed says they've been in a drawer for over a year. >> the gift card representative said these cards were already used. i'm like, where? she said one of the places was online. and i said, i don't shop from macy's online. >> reporter: he's not the only one complaining. we found similar complaints from other macy's gift cardholders who said they too just learned their $100 gift cards were worthless. two years ago a batch of best buy gift cards turned out to have zero balances as well. >> it's kind of embarrassing when it doesn't work and you hand it out. people probably don't know what to think. >> reporter: scammers were scratching off the pin
destroying a san brunei neighborhood. cbs5 julie watts explains. they are upgrading their infrastructure. upgrades that will earn pg&e a profit and force pg&e customers to pay. >> the victim shouldn't have to suffer because pg&e is making a profit from this explosion. >> reporter: many were outraged when they approved a $299 million rate increase to help pg&e pay for its pipeline safety plan. san bruno's mayor echoed a popular sentiment. >> you allow a utility responsible for the deaths of eight citizens, friends, and family to profit as a direct result of that tragedy. >> reporter: the watchdog group urged them not to let pg&e make any profit noting that many of the required fixes are due to pg&e negligence. but the spokesperson says that the company is paying for its mistakes. this money is for new improvements. >> what's important to know is that it was needed to meet new regulations. these are regulations that were put in place after san bruno. any work that needs to be done to meet existing relations have done and continue to be paid for by the shareholders. >> reporter: she says th
. meteorologist julie watts in the weather center says big changes are on the way. >> that's right. we're already seeing temperatures dropping this evening. in fact, freezing in santa rosa, 32 degrees right now. a bit warmer in san jose at 45. 46 in san francisco, as you mentioned. 35 in livermore. and 34 in concord. yes, these temperatures are chilly and we are going to see cold temperatures overnight, just not quite as cold as last night, due in part to some increasing clouds. it will be wet and windy for the extended forecast. i'll time it all out for you, coming up in just a bit. >>> if you think it's cold here in the plains, drivers in several states are being warned not to drive at all because of all that snow. this was the scene in nebraska where crews worked very hard to keep roads open. >>> in newtown, connecticut, three more families buried their children today, along with the teacher who gave her life trying to save them. >> reporter: firefighters from across the northeast came to honor seven-year-old daniel bardon. he wanted to be a firefighter some day. >> firefighters were here payi
here. july-watts discovered safeway makes more mistakes than other california grocery stores. >> there is a policy if you charge lorer than the advertised price, you get the items free under $5. >> reporter: that is what customers are supposed to get when they are overcharged at safeway. the results of a 2008 lawsuit after a statewide investigation found the same thing back then we are still finding today. widespread overcharges. we went shops at five safeway stores an were overcharged five times we compiled data from 31 california counties an 11 different states. in california alone, inspectors where overcharged on one out of every 50 items purchased over the past five years. a spokesman claims this is a store within the industry norm. last year alone, their overcharge rate was 12% higher than other grocery stores statewide. >> it creates problem. >> reporter: the federal trade commission points to their short run sales. he says with more price fluctuation comes for opportunity for error. >> changing prices all the time generates a certain level of confusion by consumers. an
are getting a surprise when they try to redeem their presents. as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts reports, it's not a pleasant surprise. >> reporter: when ed sousa tried to spend his macy's gift card yesterday. >> she said there's zero balance on this card. and i said, that can't be. i haven't used it yet. >> reporter: his second card was no good either. his mother purchased them at a northern california safeway. and ed says they have been tucked away in a drawer for more than a year. >> the gift card representative who said that these cards were already used, i'm like, where? she said, well one of the places was online. i don't shop at macy's online. >> reporter: we found similar complaints from other macy's gift cardholders who say they too just learned their $100 gift cards were worthless. it's not just macy's. two years ago a batch of best buy gift cards sold at lucky's and safeway stores had zero balances, as well. >> it's embarrassing when you hand it out. people don't know what to think. >> reporter: back then the problem was tampering. scammers scratching off the pin code
consumerwatch reporter julie watts tells us, that money is coming directly from customers. >> reporter: in the wake of the deadly san bruno pipeline explosion, pg&e is upgrading its infrastructure, upgrades will earn pg&e a profit and force pg&e customers to pay. >> the victims shouldn't have to suffer because pg&e's making a profit from this explosion. >> reporter: many were outraged when the california public utilities commission approved a $299 million rate increase to help pg&e pay for its pipeline safety plan. >> you allow a utility responsible for the deaths of eight citizens, friends and family, to profit as a direct result of that tragedy. >> reporter: the consumer watchdog group turn urged pg&e not to be allowed to make profit on its pipeline safety plans noting many of the required fixes are due to pg&e negligence but the pg&e spokesman says the company is paying for its mistakes, this money is for new improvements. >> what's important to know is it this funding was needed to meet new regulations so these are regulations that were put in place after san bruno. any work that n
with their own proposed double-digit rate hikes. critics tell cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts the move is a preemptive strike to raise rates before healthcare reform kicks in. >> a 25% increase. i felt like i had been kicked in the stomach. >> reporter: this pediatrician feels helpless. her individual blue cross health insurance premium is going up $300 a month. >> this could never get away with a 25% increase on a group plan. but we're the little guys and we have no power. >> i think that's right. >> reporter: group plans have political power so individuals and small businesses take the hit year after year and this year many believe insurers are padding their pocketbooks with higher premiums because they can't once the healthcare reform takes effect. >> if this 25% rate hike went into effect after the federal mandate to buy health insurance was in effect, there would be congressional hearings overnight. >> reporter: they are trying to get in under the ray car while unregulated. anthem propose 17.5% increase, aetna 19%, kaiser by 8% and united healthcare by 10%. jan's insurer says, "th
bills. >> reporter: when customers pay -- as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains, getting stuck with a counterfeit could cost you time and money. >> reporter: when customers pay claudia herrera pays attention. >> 650. >> reporter: since last summer the cashiers at cole hardware are required to carefully examine most bills. >> we have a procedure in place where every cashier that takes a bill $20 or larger must check the bill in three different ways. >> reporter: back in august the mom and pop operation got stung with 3 counterfeit $100 bills a big hit for the small business. >> there is no recourse really. once we have already taken the money, it's just --we're just out of luck. >> you see the difference in the portraits? >> reporter: charles white of the secret service says 55,000 in counterfeit bills show up at northern california banks every week a number that usually increase during the holidays. and whether it's a bank, business or an individual, if they accept it, they're out of luck. >> there is no part of the government that it's going to reimburse them for their l
owners are now looking for the dealer who can't be found. cbs 5 consumer watch reporter julie watts on the dealership that disappeared under the cover of darkness. >> reporter: the business is gone, along with the cars. >> tow truck just came in and towed them off. >> reporter: also missing? their money? >> drove by here every single day to make sure my car was still here. >> reporter: sunnyvale motor cars has disappeared, leaving an empty lot and a lot of angry customers who trusted the business to sell their cars on consignment. >> it's theft. >> reporter: todd parsons is out $28,000. he says the lot took his car and gave him a bad check. >> it was all a scam. >> reporter: kristy wanted to eliminate a $600 car payment, so she left sunnyvale her vw. >> the dealership said they would pay off my car once the car was sold. >> reporter: abe sharp says he's now stuck with a vehicle he can't register because there's a lien on it. >> we don't have a valid registration. >> reporter: and there are dozens of similar complaints online. adding to the frustration, these folks say so far, neithe
julie watts explains your insurance doesn't always cover fallen trees. julie. >> reporter: something many are likely learning following this weekend's storm. we received photos from across the bay area of downed trees on homes and cars, and they provide a clear example of what's covered and what's not. this one from san mateo is a good example of what's covered. homeowners insurance will pay for tree damage to your home, its contents and other structures on the property. whether the tree is on your property or your neighbor's. but when it comes to paying for tree removal, in cases like this you might be on your own. if a fallen tree doesn't damage your home, insurance will generally only pay to remove it if it's blocking a driveway. and insurance advocates warn depending on your deductible it may not be worth it to file a claim. >> when you file a claim you're looking at does it meet my deductible? let's say your deduct is $1,000 and you have $1,200 worth of damage. are you going to file a claim for $200? probably not. >> but he points out if the tree falls from your neighbor's prope
. on the consumerwatch, julie watts says that people who borrowed money from a company called check and go may actually be entitled to thousands of dollars each. julie. >> reporter: that's right. refunds in this $4.3 million settlement are expected to range anywhere from $20 to $4,600 per person. but to qualify, you must have borrowed money from check and go online. now, at a press conference today san francisco city attorney dennis herrera said check and go skirted california law by preying on the most economically vulnerable and charging interest rates as high as 400%. >> they partnered with an out- of-state bank to essentially say that we are no longer subject to the limits of 36% apr that's set in california law so as part of the settlement that we have negotiated with them they have agreed to abide by california's limits. they have discontinued that relationship with the out of state bank. and they also have established this settlement fund. >> reporter: now, to qualify for a refund you must have taken out a four-month installment loan through one of three affiliated websites between november 2006
with their own proposed double-digit rate hikes. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts says, critics say that the move is a preemptive strike to raise the rates before healthcare reform kicks in. >> a 25% increase. i felt like i had been kicked in the stomach. >> reporter: a healthcare provider herself, pediatrician jan feels helpless. her individual blue cross health insurance premium is going up nearly $300 a month. >> they could never get away with a 25% increase on a group plan but we're the little guys. we have no power. >> that's right. >> reporter: this consumer watchdog says insurance companies are reluctant to raise rates on big company group plans because of their political power. so individuals and small businesses take the hit year after year. and this year, many believe insurers are padding their pocketbooks with higher premiums because they won't be able to once the new federal healthcare law takes effect. >> if this 25% rate hike was to go into effect after the federal mandate to buy health insurance was in effect there would be congressional hearings overnight. >> reporte
consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains, getting stuck with a counterfeit could cost you time and money. >> reporter: when customers pay claudia herrera pays attention. >> 650. >> reporter: since last summer the cashiers at cole hardware are required to carefully examine most bills. >> we have a procedure in place where every cashier that takes a bill $20 or larger must check the bill in three different ways. >> reporter: back in august the mom and pop operation got stung with 3 counterfeit $100 bills a big hit for the small business. >> there is no recourse really. once we have already taken the money, it's just -- we're just out of luck. >> you see the difference in the portraits? >> reporter: charles white of the secret service says 55,000 in counterfeit bills show up at northern california banks every week a number that usually increase during the holidays. and whether it's a bank, business or an individual, if they accept it, they're out of luck. >> there is no part of the government that it's going to reimburse them for their loss. >> reporter: the best way to judge if a suspect b
hundreds of iphone 5 owners are running into. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts with one woman's story and how hard it's been for her and her fight with sprint. >> cannot open, server not responder. >> reporter: it's a message vicki gets almost every time of see this tries to access the internet on the sprint iphone 5. >> you have four full bars of 3- g connectivity but you can't catch data or upload a photo. >> reporter: there are more than 400 posts and over 60,000 views to this thread on sprint's website. iphone 5 data not working. like many, vicki first assumed it was her iphone so she went to the apple store which twice replaced it. but when her 3-g still wouldn't work? >> i started calling sprint. basically inferred i was making it up. or that it was an apple problem. >> reporter: she got the runaround for weeks and like many posts online she says with each call to sprint, she got a different answer until a sprint engineer finally gave her one that made sense. >> this is the known issue in about a dozen cities like chicago, new york, minneapolis, and because we don't know
julie watts explains, their case has forced changes companywide. >>> reporter: >> this is our dream house. >> reporter: but that dream soon turned into a nightmare for christie meredith and her family. >> usually there are droppings on the stove. three to four mice a day. >> reporter: most of them in the kitchen but also in the den and bathroom. >> my son is terrified. he is only 3. why should he have to live like this. >> reporter: the landlord touts great customer service but the merediths say despite more than a dozen calls and e-mails, way point has done nothing. >> anytime i would call them for a problem they would just blow me off. >> sounds like it particular infestation is really bad. >> reporter: tenant rights lawyer says you have recourse if your landlord ignores any serious problem. >> contact the local authorities. >> reporter: depending on the issue it's usually the building or health department. >> they will pressure the landlord. not only will they be responsible for penalties, payable to the tenants but they will be responsible for penalties payable to the city if th
consumer watch reporter julie watts on the dealership that disappeared under a cover of darkness. >> reporter: the business is gone along with the cars. >> a tow truck just came in and towed them off. >> reporter: also missing? their money. >> drove by here every single day. >> reporter: sunnyvale motor cars has disappeared leaving behind a large lot and a lot of angry customers who trusted the business to sell their cars. >> it's theft. >> reporter: todd parsons is out $28,000. the tech executive says the dealership took his car and gave him a bad check. >> it was all a scam. >> reporter: nursing student chrissy dent wanted to get rid of a $600 a month car payment. she left her vw to sell. >> the dealership here sid that they were going to pay off my loan once the car was sold. >> reporter: dent said they did sell the car and just never paid off the loan. >> i don't have a car and i have to -- still make payments on my loan. >> reporter: just as bad for the man who bought her car. he's now stuck with vehicle he can't register because there's a lien on it. >> we don't have title
oversold merchandise. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains even retail giant amazon had its share of problems. yo we placed the hard to night with my credit card and we got a confirmation an hour later that they received my order. >> reporter: that confirmation didn't guarantee carol george with see her black friday discounted tv. just like hundreds of other black friday shoppers at various online retailers over the past few years. >> on friday, when i was supposed to get the tv, i got a call. >> they sent an email saying that the item is no longer available. >> they supposedly some type of error. >> reporter: in carol's case amazon canceled her order. we received similar complaints about dell and sam's club, in years past at frye's and best buy and for many like carol had they known their order might be canceled they would have bought it at the same black friday price somewhere gilles it was available at walmart, i think sears and amazon. >> reporter: but by the time amazon canceled her order it was too late to get the deal somewhere else and amazon said she had to pay full
homeowners do increase during the holidays: cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts with some ways to protect yourself. >>> reporter: >> i tried to smile and greet him. >> reporter: it was supposed to be a routine pg&e service call. >> he just walked right by me. >> reporter: but he insists it was anything but. when someone wearing the utility's uniform walked into his home. >> it started going this way. >> reporter: the former army translator said the man didn't introduce himself and immediately began walking through the house. >> he was basically bullying inside my house. >> reporter: but most concerning, he says the man wouldn't give his name leaving him wondering if it was really a pg&e employee at all. >> we take these matters very seriously. >> reporter: the man is confirmed to be a company employee and that pg&e runs background checks on all-tech in addition. he says the utility is now investigating the incidents. >> anytime a customer of ours feels uncomfortable with an employee, bottom line is that's not okay. >> reporter: but security experts warn it's not uncommon for cr
consumerwatch reporter julie watts tells us, it's not a good surprise. >> reporter: they were a christmas gift from his mom but when ed tried to spend his macy's gift cards yesterday -- >> she said there is zero balance on this card. and i said, that can't be. i haven't used it yet. >> reporter: and his second card was no good, either. his mother purchased them at a northern california safeway and ed says they have been tucked away in a drawer for more than a year. >> the gift card representative who said that these cards were already used and i'm like, where? she said, well one of the places was online. and i said, i don't shop for macy's online. i go in a store. >> reporter: we found similar complaints from other macy's gift cardholders who say they too just learned their $100 gift cards were worthless and it's not just macy's. two years ago a batch of best buy gift cards sold at both lucky's and safeways turned out to have zero balances, as well. >> it's embarrassing when it doesn't work and you hand it out, people probably don't know what it think. >> reporter: then the problem was tampe
to their finances. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts has a follow-up on one family's experiment with a financial diet. >> reporter: she admits not spending money for a week is a headache. >> had some coffee but not nearly enough. >> reporter: but the financial planner says it was a wake-up call. >> it was tough! it was very tough. >> reporter: last week, she and her family went on a financial cleanse, a seven-day experiment in frugality. she hoped it would change the way they decide to spend money. >> for me, the goal was to just have the experience and see what came out of it. >> reporter: what came was a realization of how much and how often they spend on life's little luxuries. by her estimation, at least $60 a day, just for her immediate family. >> my daughter said she missed going to the local deli and getting a great sandwich for lunch . >> not being able to go to the movies was tough. >> reporter: the brother-in- law, who is also part of the household, found he had a lot more free time. time he put to good use. >> did some things actually to improve myself as far as my s
with new ways to try to get people into their stores. as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts shows us the chain now finds itself pretty much right back where it started. >> i came here to use my coupon. >> reporter: they're back! coupons at j.c. penney. >> ya! >> reporter: the store famously got rid of coupons and sales this year replacing them with everyday low prices. but well, the sign still says no coupons, tacked on the top are newly advertised sales. the website now boasts 20% off jewelry and jcp reportedly emailed friends and family coupons offering a three-day discount last week. >> i think their core base is hungry for it. >> reporter: he says that was clear by the customer turnout on black friday. the store advertised its one and only sale of the year and long-time customers who had been staying away showed up asking for more. >> people have to have something to look forward to. >> reporter: so everyday low prices won't get you in the door? >> no. >> i come less now than before. >> reporter: he says that's because the no sales strategy only works for a couple of specific ty
in safety. on the consumerwatch, julie watts, cbs 5. >>> lawmakers are getting down to business on gun control in the wake of the connecticut school shooting. the gun violence task force headed by vice president joe biden met today for the first time to look for ways to prevent tragedies like the one in newtown. they will be look at firearms restrictions increasing mental health resources and the media's role in guns and violence. the president wants concrete proposals in time for his state of the union address next month. >> the president is absolutely committed to keeping his promise that we will act and we will act in a way that is designed even if he says we could only save one life, we have to take action. >> san francisco mayor ed lee pushing for stronger regulations on certain types of ammunition. he is proposing a citywide ban on commercial sales of hollow point bullets. he also wants police notified when anyone in the city buys 500 or more rounds of ammunition at once. >>> san francisco police also announced plans for another gun buyback event afternoon last weekend's huge suc
. >>> new year new laws and new protections for consumers. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains how car buyers and homeowners are going to benefit in 2013. >>> reporter: from for profit education -- >> all my money my future is gone. >> reporter: -- to faulty foreclosures. >> for me they happen pretty quickly. >> reporter: and deceptive car dealers. >> , it's an in-house financing that he have. >> reporter: the consumer problems we resolved this year have run the gamut. but next year, a series of new laws may help prevent them altogether. first up buy here pay here. used car dealer financing for low income drivers. one in four of those drivers ends up with a repossessed car. >> it's leaking oil. >> reporter: borrowers like gentry ramos complain of inflated prices, unfair payment stipulations and sub cars with no warranty. now they are required to have warranty. dealers must show proof of fair market value and they can't make buyers pay each month in person. >> i go to the class every day and today they come to the class and tell me no school today. >> reporter: she and her clas
, and that's a hard lesson for homeowners who are cleaning up today. cbs 5 consumerwatch report offer julie watts explains, your insurance doesn't always cover falling trees. >> reporter: it's something many are likely learning following the weekend storm. we received photos from across the bay area of downtown trees on homes and cars. and they provided pretty clear example of what's covered and what's not. for instance, this one from san mateo is a good example of what is covered. homeowners insurance will pay for tree damage to your home, its contents and other structures on the property whether the tree was on your property or your neighbor's. but when it comes it paying for tree removal in cases like this, you might be on your own. if a fallen tree doesn't damage your home, insurance will generally only pay to remove it if it's blocking a driveway. insurance advocates warn depending on your deductible it may not be worth it to file a claim at all. >> when you file a claim you will be looking at a situation does it meet your deductible. if your deductible is $1,000 and you have a $12,000
of retailers. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts warns about the gotchas. >> reporter: online retailers aren't offering free shipping because they are nice. it increases sales. more than 1700 are offering some version of free shipping today. but it may come with a catch. for example, most have a minimum purchase requirement to get free shipping and many only offer free shipping if you purchase specific items be sure to compare prices. sites may charge you more for your purchase you can lose money by saving on shipping. and finally, just because they offer free shipping doesn't mean it will arrive by christmas. you may find you have pay extra for rush delivery. >>> southwest airlines famous for its bags fly free slogan has new fees next year. for the first two checked bags it will still be free but in its goal to generate $100 million in revenue the airline will raise the fee for a third bag from $25 to $75. it will also double the overweight fee to $100. the airline is hiking the early boarding fees from 10 to 12.50. and one plan fee that is sure up to set southwest fans a no show fee i
and bouncing checks. cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts has new information on the undercover investigation. >> reporter: following our report, ch r and associates shut down prompting former employees to come forward and come clean. tonight they warn wyoming chr is no longer a threat, many gold buyers use similar tactics. >> basically the old gold or silver we say bring it in. >> reporter: one morning he was a guest on a tv show. >> we can get you a check on the spot. >> reporter: the next the checks bounced and this traveling gold buyer was wanted by police. >> it was embarrassing. >> reporter: every. >> reporter: he said the company he worked for didn't tell him the checks were bad until it was too late and he is not alone. >> i feel sick. i have wrote checks for two days, i said, do you realize that that is fraud? >> reporter: like birdsall, she resigned after discovering she had been writing bad checks. they are just two of the dozens of thr employees across the country who came forward to reveal what they say was a culture of deception within one of the nation's largest g
with their iphones. as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains, they're complaining they're not getting the service they're paying for. >> reporter: if you have sprint iphone 5 and can't access the internet, you have company. the bbb received hundreds of complaints since the iphone 5 was released. hundreds of sprint iphone 5 users say they are having trouble uploading photos, accessing websites and pretty much using any 3-g data. a viewer called the problem to our attention and replaced her iphone twice and when that didn't help she said sprint told her it was a known problem and about a dozen u.s. cities, and even though she can't access the data she is paying for, sprint won't let her out of her contract. lawyers say she can sue for breach of contract. sprint says it's investigating. >>> and a warning tonight about a popular baby product. the nap nanny is being recalled following the death of a 4 month old baby. the consumer product safety commission says infants can fall out or get trapped against the side of the recliner and suffocate. nap nannies were sold in the u.s. between 200
about it. as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains, the case has led to some changes for the family and the company. >> this is our dream house. >> reporter: but that dream soon turned into a nightmare for christie meredith and her family. >> usually there are droppings on the stove. >> reporter: rerental sin fessed with mice most of them in the kitchen but also in the den and the bathroom. >> my son is terrified. he is only 3. why should he have to live like this. >> reporter: the landlord touts great customer service but the merediths say despite more than a dozen calls and e-mails, way point has done nothing. >> anytime i would call them for a problem they would just blow me off. >> sounds like it particular infestation is really bad. >> reporter: tenant rights lawyer says you have recourse if your landlord ignores any serious problem. >> contact the local authorities. >> reporter: depending on the issue it's usually the building or health department. >> they will pressure the landlord. not only will they be responsible for penalties, payable to the tenants but the
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)